Course Descriptions

AP/CH 1000 6.0 Elementary Modern Standard Chinese

INSTRUCTOR: Jia Ma, Shu-ying Tsau, Xueqing Xu, and Faculty

PREREQUISITE: None. Not open to speakers of ANY Chinese dialect. Placement interview required PRIOR TO ENROLMENT.

DESCRIPTION: This course serves as an introduction to Modern Standard Chinese, variously known as "Putonghua" (Common language), "Guoyu" (National language), and "Guanhua" (Mandarin). Classroom activities will focus on: 1) proper pronunciation, development of listening comprehension and oral skills, 2) essential grammatical structures of the language, and 3) acquisition of written Chinese. By the end of the academic year, students should be able to conduct simple conversations, read annotated texts and write approximately 500 characters. Students are expected to regularly attend class and language laboratory sessions.

FORMAT: Four class hours and two individual computer laboratory hours per week.

EVALUATION: Class performance - 10%; two oral presentations (10% each) – 20%; seven written tests (10% each) - 70%.

TEXTS:Tao-chung Yao et al. Integrated Chinese, Level 1, part 1. Cheng and Tsui Company, 2009. (Textbook, Workbook, and Character Workbook).

AP/CH 1010 6.0 Elementary Chinese for Advanced Beginners

INSTRUCTOR: Shu-ying Tsau, and Faculty

PREREQUISITE: Course credit exclusions: AP/CH 1000 6.0, AP/CH 2010 6.0 Note: This course prepares for entry into AP/CH 2000 6.0, AP/CH 2030 6.0 or, with permission of the department, AP/CH 3000 6.0.

DESCRIPTION: This course introduces Modern Standard Chinese (also known as Mandarin). This course is designed for two major groups of students with different initial advantages in learning Chinese: a) those who speak the language but cannot read characters, and b) those who know characters but cannot speak the language. Standard pronunciation, grammatical structures and the writing system is the focus of the course. Class lectures, classroom language practice, audio tapes and interactive computer programs are co-ordinated in classroom activities. Weekly assignments are given in class and students are expected to regularly attend class and computer laboratory sessions.

FORMAT: Four class hours and two individual computer laboratory hours per week.

EVALUATION: Five written tests (10% each) 50%, two listening comprehension tests (10% each) 20%, Class participation 10% and two oral presentations 20%

TEXTS: Tao-chung Yao et al. Integrated Chinese, Level 1, part 1. Cheng and Tsui Company, 1997. (Textbook, Workbook, and Character Workbook), Professional Interactive Chinese, Books One and Two; a text prepared from classroom use, in concert with a computer program produced for use in the language laboratory by Venture Tech, Pennsylvania. Shu-ying Tsau. Legend of Mulan. Su-ying Tsau. A Lovers' Tragedy

AP/CH 2000 6.0 Intermediate Modern Standard Chinese

INSTRUCTOR: Xueqing Xu and Faculty

PREREQUISITE: AP/CH 1000 6.0, AP/CH 1010 6.0 or permission of the Department. Not open to speakers of ANY Chinese dialect. Placement interview required PRIOR TO ENROLMENT.

DESCRIPTION: This course builds on AP/CH 1000 6.0. Listening comprehension now involves more extended passages, which are closer to normal native speed. Dialogue on practical matters now also extends to cultural comparisons, society, current events, and problems of modern life. Students will know about 1000 characters by the end of the course, and will be able to write coherent paragraphs such as letters and application forms. Grammar focuses on sentence-making, including the more difficult patterns, and begins to consider the problems of translation. This is practiced in weekly assignments, and supported by supplementary materials. Students are expected to regularly attend class and computer laboratory sessions.

FORMAT: Four class hours and two computer lab hours weekly.

EVALUATION: Classroom performance – 10%; two oral presentations – 10%; seven written tests (10% each) – 70%.

TEXTS: Tao-chung Yao et al. Integrated Chinese, Level 1 Part 2, Cheng & Tsui Company, 1997. This set consists of a Textbook, a Workbook and a Character Workbook.

AP/CH 2030 6.0 Intermediate Chinese Language and Culture

INSTRUCTOR: Jia Ma, Xueqing Xu, and Faculty

PREREQUISITE: AP/CH 1000 6.0, AP/CH 1010 6.0 or permission of the Department. Degree Credit Exclusion: AP/CH 2000 6. 0.

DESCRIPTION: An intensive intermediate Chinese language and culture course, taught on the York campus and followed by a stay at Fudan University in Shanghai. The course covers language structures and functions, vocabulary and topics on Chinese culture and civilization. This course is taught in Chinese.

FORMAT: The course will be offered in the summer session only. Four weeks on York University campus: six hours weekly (three hours twice weekly, in evenings) followed by three weeks in Shanghai; Five hours contact hours daily, plus excursions.

EVALUATION: Class participation including homework -10%; presentation (Fudan) – 20%; quizzes (3 at York; 5 at Fudan – 5% each) - 40%; test (at York) - 15%; written report (at Fudan) - 15%

TEXTS: Tao-chung Yao et al. Integrated Chinese, Level 1 Part 2, Cheng & Tsui Company, 1997. This set consists of a Textbook, a Workbook and a Character Workbook.

AP/CH 2200 6.0 INTRODUCTION TO CHINESE LITERATURE

INSTRUCTORS: Jessica Li, Xueqing Xu and Faculty

PREREQUISITE: None. Knowledge of Chinese is not expected.

Degree credit exclusion: AP/CH 2700 6.0

DESCRIPTION: This course is a survey of the major genres of Chinese literature from its ancient origins to the present. It examines selected works representative of the development of the literary tradition in its historical and cultural contexts. Philosophic classics and early historical writing are introduced, but more emphasis is put on poetry, drama, and fiction, and on critical approaches to them.

FORMAT: Three class hours weekly. Readings, lectures, discussions, reports and written assignments will all be in English.

Note: Students who are proficient in Chinese may submit their written work in Chinese.

EVALUATION: Classroom participation – 20%; two oral reports (10% each) – 20%; two essays (15% each) – 30%; three quizzes (10% each) – 30%.

TEXTS: Course kits will be available at the York Bookstore.

AP/CH 3000 6.0 Advanced Modern Standard Chinese

INSTRUCTOR: Shu-ying Tsau

PREREQUISITE: AP/CH 2000 6.0 or AP/CH 2010 6.0 or permission of the Department. Placement interview required PRIOR TO ENROLMENT.

DESCRIPTION: This course is intended to improve the students' ability to conduct conversation in both practical and cultural situations, and to start training them to read some unannotated works written for Chinese readers. Dictionaries are introduced along with the methods of finding characters by radicals, stroke count, and Pinyin. Unannotated materials (topical pieces from newspapers, magazines) and films are also used, and discussions are based on the reading and viewing. There is practice in creating logical sequences of sentences and developing a reasoned argument. At the end of the course, students know 1500 characters and have some familiarity with varieties of Chinese computer software, which are currently used in the laboratory.

FORMAT: Three class hours and two computer lab hours weekly.

EVALUATION: Seven written tests – (10% each) – 70%; class participation and homework – 10%; two oral presentations – 20%.

TEXTS: Shu-ying Tsau, Selected Original Works by Major Twentieth Century Chinese Writers; Written Text for Professional Interactive Chinese, Book Four; Tell It As It Is, Yale University Press, New Haven, 2005. All of these can be purchased at the York Bookstore. Two cassette tapes at $20.00 and photocopied reading material to be distributed in class at $10.00.

AP/CH 3010 6.0 Modern Standard Chinese for Speakers of Cantonese or Other Dialects

INSTRUCTOR: Shu-ying Tsau

PREREQUISITE: Permission of the Department; not open to speakers of Modern Standard Chinese (Mandarin). Placement interview required PRIOR TO ENROLMENT.

DESCRIPTION: The course is in four parts: (1) The basic sounds and the pinyin system, and the simplified characters. (2) Language reform in Modern China; (3) The development of modern literary Chinese as illustrated by selections from works of modern Chinese literature; (4) Comprehension and practice of the standard spoken language. Students learn to hold conversations and discussions in Modern Standard Chinese. Topics are assigned for discussion and student reports.

FORMAT: Three class hours per week.

EVALUATION: Class participation 10%; two oral presentations (10% each)-20%, written work - 30%; tests - 40%.

TEXTS: Shu-ying Tsau, Introduction to the Pronunciation of Modern Standard Chinese. Shu-ying Tsau, Selected Original Works by Major Twentieth Century Chinese Writers. Shu-ying Tsau, Written Text for Professional Interactive Chinese Book Four (used in the lab, and lab has CD.

AP/CH 3050 6.0 Advanced Modern Chinese and Culture

Set at York and Nanjing Universities, this summer course aims at improving students' Chinese language ability and introduces them to basic aspects of classical and modern Chinese civilization. The course begins with three weeks of language training at York U, and is followed by a month's program in Nanjing, China, where students will be immersed in intensive language studies in a local environment, as well as exposed to various historical sites of the city, and will gain transnational life experience.

The program will provide students with training in Chinese language and knowledge of Chinese literature and culture. Having a good knowledge of Chinese language, its history, culture, and contemporary society will significantly increase their prospects in the job market.

AP/CH 3660 6.0 Modern Chinese Drama: Cao Yu and His Contemporaries (in Chinese)

INSTRUCTORS: Pietro Giordan, Jia Ma, Xiaoning Shi and Faculty

PREREQUISITE: Knowledge of Chinese (Mandarin) is expected. All lectures, readings and assignments are in Chinese.

DESCRIPTION: Through an analysis of some of the major works by Cao Yu, the most important playwright of his generation, as well as by other artists such as Guo Moruo, Tian Han and Xia Yan, this course offers a picture of the history as well as of the main thematic and formal patterns of modern Chinese drama (Huaju) in the Republican era (1911-1949.) This course deals with topics such as representation, realism, impressionism, metatheatre, gender, modernity, allegory and otherness. Other media such as film and music may also be considered. The goal of this course is to help students develop a critical understanding of modern Chinese drama . Its theoretical approach is intrinsically comparative as the course explores how modern Chinese drama developed its specific features working out the tensions exerted by exogenous dramatic models as well as those created by the persistence of traditional cultural references. This course compares modern Chinese and Western drama and identifies some fundamental issues, topics and lines of development in the field of dramatic literature.

FORMAT: Three class hours per week.

EVALUATION:
1. Participation – 10%
2. Oral Presentation –20%
3. Major Paper – 30% (13-15 pages, second term)
4. Written Tests – 40% (2, 20% each – one each term)

TEXTS: handouts and assigned reading materials

AP/CH 3711 3.0 Women Writers in Modern and Contemporary China

INSTRUCTORS: Xueqing Xu, Jessica Li and Faculty

PREREQUISITE: None. No knowledge of Chinese or modern and contemporary Chinese literature is expected.

DESCRIPTION: This course studies the fiction of major Chinese women writers from the literary revolution of the early 1910s to the present time. Early Chinese fiction by women tends to address issues of gender in society with political messages. Yet the last forty years have seen a real renaissance in which new generations of women writers have played an important role. Characterized by introspective probing into female psychology, fiction by modern women writers depicts how Chinese women are trapped in the conflicts between power, money, and sexuality on the one hand, and their own identity and dignity on the other. In sensitivity and imagination their writings are distinctively feminine. The course will examine the development of themes, forms, and styles seen in the context of modern China and against the background of China's patriarchal tradition. Recent feminist scholarship on modern Chinese literature will be used in studying the works.

FORMAT: Three class hours per week.

EVALUATION:
1. Short essay (20%) Due October 10 at 11:30am
2. Oral Presentation (20%) See syllabus schedule
3. Presentation Follow-up Paper (25%) Due 1 class after your presentation
4 Final Exam (25%) November 28
5. Attendance & Active Participation (10%)

TEXTS: A Reading Kit. The kit will be available at the York Bookstore by the beginning of classes. The films are also considered mandatory course material.

AP/CH 3790 6.0 Contemporary Chinese Culture Through Literary Texts and Film

INSTRUCTORS: Pietro Giordan, Jia Ma and Faculty

PREREQUISITE: AP/CH 3010 6.0 or AP/CH 3000 6.0, and at least one 2000-level Chinese literature course, or permission of the department.

DESCRIPTION: Post-Mao China has witnessed a great deal of ideological, economic, and social change in the past two decades. Of the various kinds of art that mirror these changes, "new wave" text-based works and film have sparked the hottest debates and most successfully depicted the implications of these changes for personal life and society at large. By examining representative "new wave" text-based works and films in the context of modern history, this course explores the relationship between ideology and art. Focussing on such aspects as narrative technique and allegory and by investigating the film versions of some of the literary texts under discussion, this course offers insights into contemporary China.

FORMAT: Three class hours weekly. Readings, lectures, discussions, reports and written assignments will all be in Chinese.

EVALUATION: Participation – 20%; oral presentation (1st term) – 20%; major paper (13-15 pages) (2nd term) – 30%; two tests (15% each - one each term) – 30%.

TEXTS: Course Kit

AP/CH 3791 6.0 Contemporary Chinese Culture through Literary Texts and Film (in translation)

INSTRUCTOR: Pietro Giordan, Xiaoning Shi and Faculty

PREREQUISITE: None. Knowledge of Chinese is not expected for students enrolled in AP/CH 3791 6.0.

DESCRIPTION: Post-Mao China has witnessed a great deal of ideological, economic, and social change in the past two decades. Of the various kinds of art that mirror these changes, "new wave" text-based works and film have sparked the hottest debates and most successfully depicted the implications of these changes for personal life and society at large. By examining representative "new wave" text-based works and films in the context of modern history, this course explores the relationship between ideology and art. Focussing on such aspects as narrative technique and allegory and by investigating the film versions of some of the literary texts under discussion, this course offers insights into contemporary China.

FORMAT: Three class hours weekly. Readings, lectures, discussions, reports and written assignments will all be in English.

EVALUATION: Participation – 20%; oral presentation (1st term) – 20%; major paper (13-15 pages) (2nd term) – 30%; two tests (15% each - one each term) – 30%.

TEXTS: Course Kit

AP/CH 3800 3.0 Chinese-Canadian Diasporic Literature

INSTRUCTORS: Jessica Li, Jia Ma and Faculty

PREREQUISITE: None. Knowledge of Chinese is not expected for students enrolled in AP/CH 3800 6.0.

DESCRIPTION: This course studies Chinese-Canadian literature from as early as the 1890 to contemporary times, focusing mainly on fiction but including also poetry, prose essays, and drama both in English and Chinese. While examining these works' artistic qualities, it explores diasporic topics of social and cultural identity, the interaction between traditional roots and the new environment, and between cultural assimilation and resistance, as reflected in these works.

FORMAT:
1. Class participation & contribution 10%
2. Reports 15%
3. Written Tests (20% for test 1, 35% for the final) 55%
4. Oral presentations: 20%

TEXTS: handouts and assigned reading materials

AP/CH 3810 3.0 Chinese-American Diasporic Literature

INSTRUCTORS: Jessica Li, Jia Ma and Faculty

PREREQUISITE: None. Knowledge of Chinese is not expected for students enrolled in AP/CH 3810 6.0.

DESCRIPTION: The course studies Chinese-American literature from the late nineteenth century to recent times, focusing on fiction and biography in English (or Chinese). It examines literary development, its representative writers and works, which are characterized by cultural, linguistic, ethnic, and national hybridity. Both literary qualities and socio-historical values of the works will be explored and analyzed in the course.

FORMAT: Three class hours and one lab hour per week. Language of instruction – English or Modern Standard Chinese

EVALUATION:
1. Class participation & contribution 15%
2. Reports 15%
3. Written Tests (25% for test 1, 30% for the final) 55%
4. Oral presentations: 15%

TEXTS: handouts and assigned reading materials

AP/CH 3820 6.0 Modern and Contemporary Chinese Literature

INSTRUCTORS: Jessica Li, Jia Ma and Faculty

PREREQUISITE: No knowledge of modern and contemporary Chinese literature is expected. Assignments are in English or Chinese.

DESCRIPTION: The course is an introduction to modern Chinese literature from 1900 to the present, concentrating on fiction but including also poetry, prose essays and drama, both in Chinese and English translation. The course explores the development and variety of the literature over the period. Emphasis will be given to how the change has affected both content and shape of literary writing. The course explores the works' artistic qualities with attention to continuation of the classical tradition on the one hand, and to Western influences on the other. It will stress major cultural events such as the May Fourth literary revolutionary movement of the 1910s, and the Cultural Revolution of 1966-1976. Involving an entire country of the modern era, the literature reflects the dramatic changes from a semi-feudalistic and semi-colonial to an independent and economically powerful society.

FORMAT: Three class hours and one lab hour per week. Language of instruction – English or Modern Standard Chinese

EVALUATION: Written assignments
1. Participation – 10%
2. Oral Presentation –20%
3. Major Paper – 30% (13-15 pages, second term)
4. Written Tests – 40% (2, 20% each – one each term)

TEXTS: A History of Modern Chinese Fiction-Third Edition by C.T. Hsia and handouts and assigned reading materials

AP/CH 4000 SU 6.0 Classical Chinese Language

Course Description: This course serves as an introduction to Chinese classical language-- a bearer of Chinese traditional thoughts, philosophy, literature, arts, and culture in general. Selected readings are works by masters of ancient Chinese philosophy, and by historians, poets and essayists, which display a variety of styles of Classical Chinese. Students will be introduced to basic Classical Chinese grammar, syntax, and rhetoric expressions. A cultural excursion to the Royal Ontario Museum, examining traditional calligraphy and artifacts, assists students with experiential learning.

AP/CH 4050 6.0 Advanced Chinese for Business

INSTRUCTOR: Jia Ma and Faculty

PREREQUISITE: AP/CH 3000 6.0, AP/CH 3010 6.0, or equivalent, or permission of the Department

DESCRIPTION: The course deals with the specialized language of business-related subjects, including business etiquette. Materials include a text of formal conversations on typical business transactions, newspaper and journal articles, as well as TV news broadcasts on foreign trade and economic development.

FORMAT: Three class hours and one lab hour per week. Language of instruction - Modern Standard Chinese

EVALUATION: Written assignments (2, each 10%) - 20%, written tests (2, each 10%) - 20%, oral presentations (2, each 10%) - 20%, final examination - 30%, class participation - 10%.

TEXTS: Yuan, Fangyuan. Advanced Business Chinese: Economy and Commerce in a Changing China and the Changing World. New Haven: Yale University Press, 2004

AP/CH 4300 6.0 Classical Chinese Fiction

INSTRUCTORS: Xueqing Xu, Xiaoning Shi and Faculty

PREREQUISITE: Knowledge of classical Chinese literature is expected. Assignments are in Chinese.

DESCRIPTION: This course is a study of major developments in the history and art of traditional Chinese fiction. It examines selected works written in both classical and vernacular language forms that represent a variety of story forms, from zhiguai 志怪 (Accounts of Anomalies), chuanqi 传奇 (Transmitting the Remarkable), bianwen 变文 (Transformation Texts), hua-pen 话本 (Storybooks) to longer classical novels from the Ming to Qing dynasties. The literary approach focuses on plot construction, characterization, narrative stance, techniques of conveying meaning, and historical and cultural connotations in the texts. The rich sources of classical Chinese fiction—history, mythology, Daoism, and Buddhism--will be probed as they were transformed in the fiction of different eras.

FORMAT: Three hours weekly: one two-hour seminar, one lecture. Students are expected to be prepared for and to participate in the discussion.

EVALUATION:
Participation: 10%
Presentations: 20% (two, 10% each)
In Class Essays 30% (two, 15% each)
Term papers: 40% (two, first 2000 words, 15%; second 3000 words, 25%)

TEXTS: Classical Chinese Fiction (course kit), available in the York U book store;
吴承恩。西游记。香港:世界书局,1953。
施耐庵。水浒传。北京:人民文学出版社,1997。
罗贯中。三国志演义。北京:中华书局,1995。
兰陵笑笑生。金瓶梅。济南:齐鲁书社。1987。
曹雪芹。红楼梦。北京:人民文学出版社,1982。
吴敬梓。儒林外史。上海:古籍出版社,1990。
李汝珍。镜花缘。 上海:古籍出版社,1990。
刘锷。 老残游记。 香港:世界书局,1062。
吴沃尧。二十年目睹之怪现状。香港:世界书局,1962。

AP/CH 4800 Humor and Satire in Modern and Contemporary Chinese Literature

Course Description:

This course introduces the world's oldest tradition of humor and satire, and focuses on their characteristics in both written and oral works in modern and contemporary Chinese. Students learn the theory and the relationship between humor and satire, as well as their particular artistic devices. Through reading, acting and analysis of the selected works they experience how the Chinese language is creatively, colorfully and skillfully used and understand why such works are highly appreciated by the Chinese people in their daily lives. Throughout the course, the students are encouraged to bring examples of humor/satire encountered in their own daily lives or reading, and to experiment with composing their own creative humorous and satirical works in Chinese. Prerequisite: Any 3000 level Chinese language or literature course, or with permission of the department. Course credit exclusions: None.

AP/CH 4880 Culture Translation and Chinese Modernities

This course aims to explore the process of cultural translation in Chinese societies that leads to the construction of Chinese modernities as an emergent global phenomenon. Themes of this course include May Fourth modernization, Cultural Revolution, colonial and postcolonial regimes, cosmopolitan culture, immigration, travel, and exiles, thus leading to the construction of multiple identities in Chinese modernities, both on the mainland and in the diasporas.